VIRTUAL RESOURCES

 

BATTLE OF BRITAIN 80

BATTLE OF BRITAIN 80: MEMORIAL EVENT

On the Sunday before ‘Battle of Britain Day’, we would like to take this time to remember the fallen; the men and women who gave their lives during the Battle of Britain eighty years ago. In lieu of hosting a live ceremony please watch our virtual event, which includes speeches from Prime Minister Boris Johnson, the Polish Embassy UK Ambassador Arkady Rzegocki, the Mayor of London Borough of Hillingdon Cllr Teji Barnes and representatives from the Royal Air Force, Polish Air Force Memorial Committee, Polish Airmen’s Assocation and Friends of No. 11 Group. We hope you enjoy this commemorative ceremony and take a moment to reflect and remember the fallen.

HOW THE HURRICANE CAME TO BE

Military aviation historian and historic aircraft pilot, Howard Cook, visited the Battle of Britain Bunker for a virtual lecture. In this video Howard discusses the history of the Hawker Hurricane, and how its design and purpose were influenced by previous aircraft from the First World War and the interwar years. The Hurricane is often referred to as the ‘workhorse’ of the RAF during the Battle of Britain and made up over half of the total number of fighter aircraft that participated. We hope you enjoy this virtual lecture – stay tuned for more to come!

THE LEGACY OF THE SPITFIRE

Historian and author Paul Beaver at the Bunker to discuss the legacy of the Spitfire. How did this fighter aircraft become so iconic and what makes it so special? We hope you enjoy another one of our virtual lectures and tune in tomorrow at 11:00 for our special 80th anniversary commemorative event.

THE AIR DEFENCE SYSTEM

Battle of Britain historian and author Stephen Bungay is in our underground Bunker to discuss the air defence system, commonly known as ‘The Dowding System’. From the First World War, developments in technology, communication, and detection allowed for the creation of the first integrated air defence system, a critical factor in winning the Battle of Britain.

THE BUNKER

THE BUNKER

Please explore our gallery of photographs showing different interior shots of the Bunker. Completed in 1939, the Bunker housed the Operations Room for No. 11 Group (Fighter Command) during the Second World War. Located deep underground, the Bunker remained top secret throughout the war and was reopened alongside our Exhibition and Visitor Centre in 2018.

THE BUNKER IN 80 SECONDS

This year, we commemorate the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain. During lockdown we have created an 80 second tour of our Operations Room for you to experience from home.

PRIDE MONTH 2020

Pride Month is dedicated to celebrating LGBTQ+ communities around the world. For the first time ever, the Bunker has done a ‘virtual celebration’ of Pride Month by showcasing our colourful collection to form a rainbow. The rainbow flag is the symbol of the Pride movement, the colours reflect the diversity of the LGBTQ+ community, and the flag is often used as a symbol of collective pride during marches. 

RED CONTROLLER’S TELEPHONE

This telephone was used by the Group Controller in the Controller’s Cabin. The Controller sat overlooking the plotting table and could see what was happening in real time. The Controller had as little as two minutes to analyse this information and make a decision on how best to respond to the threat and deploy available squadrons.

ORANGE PLOTTING MARKER

This arrow would have been used on the map table in the Plotting Room (Operations Room) in the Bunker. Arrows like this one could have pointed out important information, or shown the direction of travel for an enemy raid. Originally, these markers would have been made out of wood or Bakelite (an early form of plastic), but this one here is painted metal.

YELLOW LIFE PRESERVER

Life preservers were especially important during the Battle of Britain, when many fighter pilots found themselves flying over the English Channel. This particular version is the 1932 Pattern, and its waistcoat design closed with three buttons and two buckled straps. Some personnel painted their life preservers with bright yellow paint, so they could be easily spotted after baling out of the aircraft into water.

GREEN ANTI-AIRCRAFT SEARCHLIGHT

A searchlight would have been used throughout Britain to locate enemy aircraft at night. It produced a powerful beam (90cm in diameter) and had a five mile range. Once the enemy aircraft had been spotted, the searchlight would attempt to ‘lock on’ to the aerial target and anti-aircraft gunners would open fire. Many searchlights were operated by women from the Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS).

BLUE ROYAL OBSERVER CORP JACKET

Here is our blue Royal Observer Corp uniform jacket. The Observer Corps provided information about enemy raids and spotted, tracked and reported enemy aircraft as it passed over Britain. Any relevant information would be reported to the regional Headquarters and then passed to Group and Sector Operations Rooms. This jacket was part of the new issued uniform following the title change to Royal Observer Corps in 1941.

PURPLE NITRILE GLOVES

To complete our rainbow for the end of Pride Month, we’ve chosen a rather unusual item… nitrile gloves! Whilst these are not part of our collection, they play an important role in keeping artefacts safe when handling. We wear gloves when working with all of our objects, as our skin secretes oils and metabolic wastes (salts, etc) and these can react aggressively with some materials causing irreversible damage. For example, fingerprints can cause damage/corrosion on metals. Nitrile gloves can also protect us from any substances on objects that may be harmful to us, such as historic paints. Needless to say, we would not be able to do our jobs without them.

FOR FAMILIES

WOMEN IN THE BUNKER

Download our free resource pack about the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force, and ‘Women in the Bunker’. Learn more about women during the Second World War, and the important role they had here at RAF Uxbridge. Created by our Education Team, this pack is filled with information, photographs, and fun activities to do at home. This particular packet is aimed for Key Stage 2 students.

MAKE YOUR OWN LITTLE SHIP

To continue our virtual commemoration of the 80th anniversary of the Dunkirk evacuation, we invite you and your family to make your own ‘little ship’! Small ships, such as rowing boats, fishing vessels and lifeboats, were needed to speed up the evacuation. The smaller boats could go closer to the beaches and pick up the troops without running aground. The patriotic tale of these smaller ships, some captained by their civilian owners, played an important role in this large scale evacuation. So, let’s try making our own!

CREATE YOUR OWN BUNKER

It’s time to get crafty, and create your own Bunker! Using recyclable materials found at home, we have created a miniature Bunker with plotting map, Tote Board, Dais and even the Controller’s Cabin. Why not download this free education pack and see if you and your family can recreate our Bunker.

DUNKIRK 80

DUNKIRK 80

Eighty years ago this year, Operation Dynamo (26 May – 4 June 1940) was launched to evacuate Allied service personnel from Dunkirk on the coast of France. It was a huge rescue mission resulting in the evacuation of over 338,000 servicemen. To commemorate this important anniversary, we have produced five panels providing information on the role of No. 11 Group and the Bunker.

DUNKIRK 80: FIGHTER FACTS IN 80 SECONDS

PART I

To commemorate the 80th anniversary of Operation Dynamo we have created two short videos sharing a few facts about the Bunker and its role leading up to and during the evacuation. Content includes operations over France and operations over South-East England.

Image acknowledgements: Images 2 & 3: Ⓒ Crown copyright. Courtesy of Air Historical Branch, Image 4: The National Archives, Battle of Britain fighter defences map, 1940 (AIR 41/16).

 

DUNKIRK 80: FIGHTER FACTS IN 80 SECONDS

PART II

Content includes the protection of convoys and of the Herring Fleet.

Image acknowledgement: Image 1: Commonwealth War Graves Commission (cwgc.org)

D-DAY

D-DAY 76 

IN 76 SECONDS

As we continue to commemorate the 76th anniversary of Operation Overlord, Bunker volunteer – Chris – has provided a few facts on the site’s important role during the Normandy landings — all in 76 seconds! You can learn more about D-Day and Operation Overlord when we reopen by exploring our D-Day exhibition, which will remain on display throughout 2020.

Image Three ‘D-Day – British Forces During the Invasion of Normandy 6 June 1944’ © IWM CL 22